jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO! Meet the oldest living things in the world

I hope this video changes how you view a “lifetime”. Every organism you’re about to meet represents a single individual that has been alive for more than 2,000 years. Some of them have been around since before human society even existed.

This week, with the help of artist and photographer Rachel Sussman (whose photographs are collected in the amazing book The Oldest Living Things In The World), I explore some of Earth’s senior citizens. 

A 5,000 year-old pine tree. An 80,000 year-old grove of aspens. A 100,000 year-old meadow of sea grass. Even 500,000 year-old, continuously-living bacteria… how did they get so old? Why do they live so long? Can these survivors survive us? And what others might be out there?

Dip your toe into deep time, and think about this: Is every moment a lifetime? Or Is every lifetime just a moment?

Watch the video below, and if you enjoy, please share and subscribe:

thenewenlightenmentage
thenewenlightenmentage:

'Quantum Cheshire Cat' becomes reality
Scientists have for the first time separated a particle from one of its physical properties - creating a “quantum Cheshire Cat”.
The phenomenon is named after the curious feline in Alice in Wonderland, who vanishes leaving only its grin.
Researchers took a beam of neutrons and separated them from their magnetic moment, like passengers and their baggage at airport security.
They describe their feat in Nature Communications.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

'Quantum Cheshire Cat' becomes reality

Scientists have for the first time separated a particle from one of its physical properties - creating a “quantum Cheshire Cat”.

The phenomenon is named after the curious feline in Alice in Wonderland, who vanishes leaving only its grin.

Researchers took a beam of neutrons and separated them from their magnetic moment, like passengers and their baggage at airport security.

They describe their feat in Nature Communications.

Continue Reading